Physics Grading Criteria

Physics Skills Grading Criteria By Category

9

Understanding – You can recall, select and communicate precise knowledge and deep understanding of physics beyond the syllabus. You can demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the nature of physics, its laws, principles and applications. You can explain a wide range effects sequencing concepts learnt in lessons together.

 

Using Formulae – You can apply appropriate mathematical knowledge, skills and understanding effectively in a wide range of practical and other contexts. You can set out calculations clearly using correct units and rearranging equations effectively.

 

Units – You clearly show a detailed understanding of scale in terms of time, size and space. You can use all units correctly and understand where different units come from. You can derive a quantity’s unit if needed.

 

Scientific Vocabulary - You use scientific and technical knowledge, terminology and conventions appropriately and consistently. You communicate your ideas appropriately in a wide range of practical and other contexts.

 

How Science Works - You show a comprehensive understanding of the relationships between hypotheses, evidence, theories and explanations and make effective use of models, including mathematical models, to explain abstract concepts. You evaluate and compare multiple sources of information systematically to develop arguments and explanations, taking account of the limitations of the available evidence. You understand the relationships between scientific advances, their ethical implications and the benefits and risks associated with them.

 

Graph S – During practical work you carefully take measurements and record them in an appropriately formed table. You draw graphs effectively and with precision using appropriate scales and labelling of axes. You can analyse, interpret and critically evaluate a broad range of quantitative and qualitative data from both tables and graphs.

 

 

8

Understanding – You can recall, select and communicate a wide knowledge and detailed understanding of physics. You can demonstrate a detailed understanding of the nature of physics, its laws, principles and applications. You can explain a wide range of effects and concepts.

 

Using Formulae – You can apply appropriate mathematical knowledge, skills and understanding effectively in a range of practical and other contexts. You can set out calculations clearly using correct units and rearranging equations effectively with very few mistakes. At this level you rarely make mistakes. Careless errors may be present; perhaps not addressing prefixes or incorrectly gathering data from a question.

 

Units – You show a detailed understanding of scale in terms of time, size and space. You can use almost all units correctly and understand where some different units come from. You can use units to help you check the validity of an equation.

 

Scientific Vocabulary - You use scientific and technical knowledge, terminology and conventions appropriately and consistently. You communicate your ideas appropriately in a range of practical and other contexts.

 

How Science Works - You show a developed understanding of the relationships between hypotheses, evidence, theories and explanations and make effective use of models, including mathematical models, to explain abstract concepts. You evaluate multiple sources of information individually to develop arguments and explanations, taking account of the individual limitations of the available evidence. You understand the relationships between scientific advances, their ethical implications and the benefits and risks associated with them.

 

Graph S – During practical work you carefully take measurements and record them in an appropriately formed table. You draw graphs effectively and using appropriate scales and labelling of axes. You can analyse, interpret and critically evaluate a broad range of quantitative and qualitative data from both tables and graphs.

 

 

 

7

Understanding – You can recall, select and communicate a wide knowledge and well-developed understanding of physics. You can demonstrate a well-developed understanding of the nature of physics, its laws, principles and applications. You can explain a range of effects and concepts.

Sometimes, your explanations become muddled as you have not yet joined all of the concepts you have learnt together. This can lead to confused thinking. You may also struggle to respond to a novel situation where your understanding is tested in an unfamiliar setting.

 

Using Formulae – You can apply appropriate mathematical knowledge, skills and understanding effectively in a range of practical and other contexts. You can set out calculations clearly using correct units and rearranging equations effectively with few mistakes. Often mistakes in calculations originate in weak understanding resulting in the wrong values being placed into a formula.

 

Units – You show an understanding of scale in terms of time, size and space. You can use most units correctly and understand how units relate to each other.

 

Scientific Vocabulary - You use scientific and technical knowledge, terminology and conventions appropriately. You communicate your ideas appropriately in a range of contexts.

 

How Science Works - You show an understanding of the relationships between hypotheses, evidence, theories and explanations and make use of models, including mathematical models, to explain abstract concepts. You evaluate a few sources of information individually to develop arguments and explanations; you can identify bias in different types of evidence. You understand the relationships between scientific advances, their ethical implications and the benefits and risks associated with them.

 

Graph S – During practical work you take measurements and record them in a reasonable table. You draw graphs effectively often using appropriate scales and labelling of axes. You can analyse, interpret and critically evaluate a broad range of quantitative and qualitative data from both tables and graphs.

 

 

6

Understanding – You can recall, select and communicate a decent knowledge and reasonable understanding of physics. You can demonstrate an understanding of the nature of physics, its laws, principles and applications. You can explain a range of effects and concepts.

You may find that during assessments you struggle to find an answer you’re happy with, often because you have conflicting views or explanations. This will result in you getting some questions wrong.

 

Using Formulae – You can apply mathematical knowledge, skills and understanding effectively in different contexts. You can set out calculations using mainly correct units and rearranging equations effectively with some mistakes. You are quite likely to make mistakes with prefixes or when gathering the correct data for the formula being used. You may also find some formulae difficult to rearrange.

 

Units – You show an understanding of scale in terms of time, size and space. You can use units correctly but sometimes you will use the wrong unit or forget to include it.

 

Scientific Vocabulary - You use scientific and technical knowledge, terminology and conventions but can struggle to explain concepts because you have not fully grasped the vocabulary. You are able to communicate your ideas appropriately in a range of contexts but can struggle with more demanding concepts.

 

How Science Works - You show a fair understanding of the relationships between hypotheses, evidence, theories and explanations and can sometimes make use of models, including mathematical models, to explain concepts. You evaluate a limited range of sources of information to develop arguments and explanations; you can sometimes fail to identify bias in your evidence due to its limited range for comparison. You understand that scientific advances can have ethical implications and can, to some extent, explain benefits and risks associated with them.

 

Graph S – During practical work you take measurements and record them in some form of table. You draw graphs with errors and can make mistakes when choosing appropriate scales and labels for axes. You can interpret a range of quantitative and qualitative data from both tables and graphs.

 

 

5

Understanding – You can recall, select and communicate a limited knowledge and understanding of physics. You can demonstrate an understanding of the nature of select parts of physics, its laws, principles and applications but your understanding is incomplete. You can explain a limited range of effects and concepts.

 

Using Formulae – You can apply some mathematical knowledge, skills and understanding in simple contexts. You can set out calculations and use equations but frequently forget to use the correct units and make errors in calculations.

 

Units – You show some understanding of scale in terms of time, size and space but have difficulty relating scales together. You can use units correctly but frequently you will use the wrong unit or forget to include it.

 

Scientific Vocabulary - You use some scientific and technical knowledge, terminology and conventions but can struggle to explain concepts because you have not fully grasped the vocabulary, you will use vocabulary you have learnt in the wrong context. You are able to communicate your ideas in a small range of contexts and can struggle with more demanding concepts.

 

How Science Works - You show a confused understanding of the relationships between hypotheses, evidence, theories and explanations and have difficultly using models, including mathematical models, to explain concepts. You evaluate a very few sources of information and you often fail to identify bias in your. You understand that scientific advances can have ethical implications but have difficulty explaining the benefits and risks associated with them.

 

Graph S – During practical work you take measurements with help and record them in some form of table. You draw graphs with frequent errors and often make mistakes when choosing appropriate scales and labels for axes. You can interpret data from both tables and graphs but sometimes the interpretation will be incorrect.

 

Year 12 / 13
*

You are able to complete multi stage calculation independently. You can generate your own formulae and often use mathematical techniques beyond the Physics spec.
You follow all of the criteria for graphs as set out in the front of your book. You are able to put all functions into linear form understanding what the gradient and y-intercept represent.
In lessons you participate in group work and contribute complicated ideas either to your friends or with the group.
You are able to explain a wide range of effects through a sequencing a series of concepts learnt in your lessons. You have a thorough working knowledge of the specifications learning points.
You always use the correct scientific terms when explaining phenomena and scientific method used for the ISA.

 

 

A

You are able to complete multi stage calculation with little or no help. You can generate your some of your own formulae and use mathematical techniques beyond the Physics spec.
You follow all of the criteria for graphs as set out in the front of your book. You are able to putt all functions into linear form understanding what the gradient and y-intercept represent.
In lessons you participate in group work and contribute complicated ideas either to your friends or to the class. You have a working knowledge of the specifications learning points.
You are able to explain a wide range of effects through a sequencing a series of concepts learnt in your lessons.
You usually use the correct scientific terms when explaining phenomena and scientific method used for the ISA.

 

 

B

You are able to complete multi stage calculations but will occasionally need help. You can generate your some of your own formulae but mainly rely on ones on the data sheet. You use mathematical techniques as set out by the specification
You follow most of the criteria for graphs as set out in the front of your book. You are able to putt most functions into linear form, understanding what the gradient and y-intercept represent.
In lessons you sometimes participate in group work and contribute ideas either to your friends or to the class. You have an awareness of the specifications learning points.
You are able to explain a range of effects through a sequencing a series of concepts learnt in your lessons but often these lack completeness.
You usually use the correct scientific terms when explaining phenomena and scientific method used for the ISA.

 

C

You are able to complete single stage calculations.

You mainly rely on formulae published on the data sheet. You use mathematical techniques as set out by the specification but you can struggle with some of the more complex ideas.
You follow most of the criteria for graphs as set out in the front of your book but can also be prone to making careless errors. You are able to put some functions into linear form and usually understand what the gradient and y-intercept represent.
In lessons you participate in group work and contribute ideas either to your friends or to the class. You have a shallow awareness of the specifications learning points.
You are able to explain effects through a sequencing a series of concepts learnt in your lessons but often these lack completeness.
You usually use the correct scientific terms when explaining phenomena and scientific method used for the ISA.